The History Of Flight Simulator Games

Flight simulators are virtual tools that are designed to teach the user how to fly an aircraft without the risk. When you are learning how to fly professionally or for fun, you cannot buckle yourself into a 747 and expect to catch on in a matter of minutes. Flying an aircraft is not like riding a bike; one small mistake can have serious consequences. This is why flight simulator games were created to help teach training pilots how to fly. Learn about the history of flight simulation and see just how much it has advanced over the years.

The first known arcade game to use flight simulation was Jet Rocket. This simulator was released by Sega in 1970 and was designed as a form of entertainment and not training. The game featured a cockpit complete with all of the controls and a basic and stationary landscaping scene on the screen. Players could shoot missiles and explode targets before their eyes.

The advancement of these types of games brought the release of Jet Rocket making way for a whole genre of combat simulator games. The next popular game to hit the arcades was Interceptor made by Taito in 1975. This first-person shooter took flight simulation to a new level and used a joystick so the player could aim at enemy aircraft and disintegrate them in mid-air.

It was not until the 1980s that flight simulator games were made for personal computers. They have remained very popular on personal computers to this day. The first PC game to hit the market was subLOGIC. The subLOGIC game, created by Bruce Artwick, has basic graphics, real world scenery, and a mock control panel. The creator made several different versions of subLOGIC for Mac computers and later for IBM compatible computers. The IBM compatible versions were licensed under Microsoft as Flight Simulator 1.00. The company later released 2.0 and 3.0 versions with more aircraft options and better graphics.

After PC games, came more advanced games for playing consoles in the home. Sega released a flight simulator game in 1987 that was titled After Burner. This combat game used a joystick and was widely popular on the Genesis and later the PlayStation. Super Nintendo also released a game called Pilotwings. This game helped the player earn their pilot license by completing flight lessons that were built into the game.

These types of games may have started out slow but they have graduated into a huge market. They are designed to entertain you and teach you what it feels like to control an actual aircraft. New simulator games have advanced so much that you will really feel like you are controlling a plane. If you choose the right game, you can use controls that are found in actual cockpits and select the weather and time of day you want to fly. You can even fly over your house and see it with satellite technology. The world of flight games will continue to grow.

A Combat Flight Simulator in Europe

When considering the wars that are most significant to our planet’s history, World Wars I & II would have to be at the top of the list. Because they were fought overseas, combat flight simulator Europe is one the most sought after games in the industry. Imagine flying a military plane during that time period and living to talk about it.

Very few flight simulation software packages offer actual air-to-air combat. In fact, even though many people are fascinated by the events of the World Wars, you will have trouble finding simulation software that lets you fight it out in the sky.

One issue for software programs that do allow air battle is that the realism is diminished for the sake of gaming playability. Noncombat flight simulation software is so lifelike, you won’t be sure if it is live or Memorex.

In the future, a combat flight simulator in Europe and many other locations will be a possibility. But for now, gamers that love the feeling of realistic flight will have to settle for options that, although they aren’t battling it out, are full of potentially thousands of scenarios for hours of adventure.

Many flight simulation programs include a host of combat-type aircraft for indulging in the war-time fantasy. In fact, an example of an aircraft from that time period is the Sopwith Camel.

This plane was designed by British aircraft designer Thomas Sopwith, and it was not advanced into the Western Front of WWI until 1917. By shooting down 1,294 enemy aircraft, it had the reputation of being one the most successful fighter planes of the war.

On the other side, the German Fokker Dr.1 Triplane, which was developed by government mandate in response to the British Sopwith Camel, came into the European forefront in 1917 with a distinguished but short career. It was very maneuverable but not fast enough to elude the enemy. It also had other issues including a small, cramped cockpit that provided little protection for the pilot.

These classic fighter planes create a type of addiction to flight simulation. Some of the high-tech craft such as the Lockheed P-80 Shooting Star and the MiG-15 fit the bill for a pilot’s need for speed in today’s flight sim games, but combat flight simulator in Europe still offers intrigue for retro plane enthusiasts to create mock battles and missions of a time gone by.

You can choose to fly in formation and decide which routes to fly, and when or where to take off and land. If you like to be daring, you can perform aerial stunts and even practice landing on an aircraft carrier. Even though it isn’t quite the same as combat flight simulator Europe, it still simulates a controlled crash!

Some flight simulation software are open source, meaning that there is a huge group of really intelligent computer fanatics working on making the realism better all the time. Eventually, a combat flight simulator in Europe will probably be an option.

Turn Your Basement Into a Virtual Shooting Gallery

An indoor shooting simulator is easy to add on to most projection based home theater systems, and in most cases is an inexpensive way to add hours of entertainment for the whole family. People of all ages enjoy playing the wide range of games that are available for the system, everything from “Baseball Challenge” to “Elephant Hunter” will keep your family and friends entertained. Utilizing a shooting simulator is not only a great way to add excitement to your home theater room; it is also a get way to keep your shooting skills sharp.

System Basics:
There are a few basic requirements for adding a shooting simulator to an existing home theater. The simulator runs on a normal Windows based computer, software is compatible with Windows XP, Windows Vista and Windows 7. The image is broadcast through a projector to a screen, which most projectors and home theater screens will be suitable for use with this simulator. Now all you need to add is a basic simulator package, which includes a rifle, case, camera and five games. Installation of the simulator will only take about thirty minutes to setup and install the new software and hardware. Now you are ready to start enjoying the very best of simulated shooting. To recap the items you need: computer, projector, screen and a simulator package.

Benefits of Indoor Shooting:
There are many advantages to adding an indoor shooting simulator to you home theater room, these are just a few.
Convenience- having the ability to practice your shooting skills from within your own house, cuts down on drive time to the range and you can fire up your system anytime you want.
Cost Savings- ammunition is expensive! You will save a lot of money practicing your skills using a true to life replica laser firearm verses using live ammo.
Safety- using a laser firearm is a much safer weapon to practice will and it’s a lot better for your hearing.
Shooting Variety- with a shooting simulator you have the ability to practice your skills on a wide range of software titles. You can practice shooting skeet and with just a touch of a button you can switch over to another game and practice your marksmanship on simulated popup targets.
Entertainment- Gather you friends and family, challenge them for the highest score or for bragging rights.

Packages and Software:
With this system, there are many packages of both hardware and software available. Looking for a portable package or maybe a complete package if you don’t have a projector, computer and screen? Those packages and more are available. There are over 35 software titles currently available, which can be purchased separately or in 15 game packages. Software titles are being added, so you will always have the option to buy the latest games on the market. Do you have the best Halloween party on your block? There is a Halloween software package that will insure your party is unforgettable. Do you have a young hunter or marksman that could benefit from “Hunter’s Education” software? It is an option on this simulator. Teach them everything from ethical shooting to animal anatomy, with the hunter’s Ed package. Looking to hone your archery skills? This simulator has packages available for you bow enthusiasts. There are several optional firearms which can be added to the system, to maximize the skill development and enjoyment of the simulator.

Adding a shooting simulator to your theater room is easy and a cost effective way of increasing the entertainment value of your room as well as improve shooting skills. If you would like some more information on the shooting simulators or have any questions please contact me through the website.